With Mous, the Sibling Scions of Arteriors Step Out on Their Own

For Tanner Moussa and Mackenzie Lewis, design runs in the blood. The siblings spent their childhood in impeccably designed showrooms, watching artisans at work on factory floors, forging connections with makers, and, most importantly, inheriting a deep reverence for all-things interiors—one born from three generations of furniture designers at the Moussa family business, Arteriors. They are now edging to make their own imprint on the industry with Mous, which launches online this week with a line of elevated casegoods, seating, and objects.

As Moussa and Lewis see it, this endeavor is about showing their vision to the industry that raised them. “We wanted to take what we’ve learned from the past two generations and the development of our refined design eye to create an elevated collection of unique furniture,” explains Moussa. “We are motivated to put our mark on something new and create a brand of our own by collaborating with artisans that we’ve come to know over the years, and now consider family.”

Mous cofounders Mackenzie Lewis and Tanner Moussa alongside debut pieces including the Sinewave sofa, Scroll buffet, and Radial cocktail table.

Photo: Kris Ellis

That refinement takes shape in a series of playfully sculptural silhouettes that are carefully finished, stitched, and glazed by hand. Oblong casegoods, svelte seating, and artisan-made objects make up the inaugural collection, Narrative Arc, which aims to pinpoint the intersection of classic contemporary design and craft. French Deco’s sinuous forms and Egyptian influences are also cited as inspirations behind the debut designs.

“We’ve been traveling our whole lives from factories to architectural marvels and our exposure to these places and cultures has led us to understand and embrace the greatest craftsmanship and the hardest feats of production,” says Lewis.

The work is elevated through materials, as shown by the Cusp cabinet’s leather-wrapped doors, the Cassini end table’s lacquer sheen, and the Diptych desk’s ivory vellum-covered form. Casegoods start at $3,000.

Photo: Kris Ellis

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